On Mentoring

So much for updating on a weekly basis.

Well, to be fair, I did spend most of the last two weeks on mentoring, getting back into my yoga program, and slowly reintegrating with the real world now that I am fully vaccinated against COVID-19. I was able to go hang out with some friends, and I was able to go to the dentist for the first time in years. Hoo boy—I was never so happy going to the dentist as I was last week!

It’s been a full two weeks since my last post, though, and I did say that I was going to try to update this blog more regularly so here I am.

In the span of the last two weeks, I was able to make a total of ONE finished comic strip. I’m beginning to think that this path is not what I should be on right now. What I SEEM to be more inclined to do these days is explore ways to make my streaming setup better for our CPAG mentoring sessions and prepare for the next demo.

It’s becoming clearer to me that I’m more interested in teaching other people about drawing and making art than making comics myself—which for the most part is supposed to be for self-expression—but I’ve been doing a lot more of that just by writing here and being on social media more often. I guess when it comes to writing my thoughts down into comic form, well, it seems rather redundant now.

So, given that making comics doesn’t seem to interest me as much, perhaps the best thing for me to do right now is to really lean into this whole ‘mentoring’ business.

It feels a little bit weird, calling myself a mentor. I recall a conversation with a friend sometime back that I had trouble with the word ‘mentor’ because I feel like it’s a title that people attach to you, and not you onto yourself. For me, a mentor is not just someone who helps you become more skillful but really cares about your life and your goals. So, a mentor is not just a teacher, but also a friend.

But how do I become that for almost two hundred people (and more, when CPAG decides to open more scholarship slots)?

I’m still in the process of figuring that out. While I’m likely not going to remember every single one of our scholars, I can try my best to give them the best support they can get. I also acknowledge that I’m just one person and that I am not solely responsible for their growth. They must still do the work, and I’m here to help where and when I can.

I suppose my journey is taking me onto the path of becoming an art educator. While I may not have formal training in education, everything on this path seems to align better with my values and interests. It’s going to be a lot of learning for me as well, and that’s something I love to do.

I’m going on an adventure!

Bilbo Baggins running out of the shire

Well, six months since I posted about how I got into NFTs, I finally got the resources and the courage to finally leave my job in game development and become an independent artist.

I can’t say that this new adventure doesn’t fill me with both excitement and dread. I have been trying to make a living off of art for as long as I can remember, even before I graduated from college.

Before I started selling art as NFTs, I was resigned to my fate that I would always be working on other people’s projects first, personal projects second. Game development being the way it is, I never really had enough mindspace and energy to work on more complex personal projects, like keeping this blog/website updated regularly.

So… now that I have what seems like all the time in the world: now what?

Well-meaning friends have been asking me what my plans are, and the best answer I can give is that I’m still figuring that out. One of the things that I’ve learned from the past couple of years is that over-planning in a rapidly changing world (moreso due to the pandemic, but also in terms of the crypto space) will only lead to frustration. So the goal is to be a bit more flexible and just go with the flow for a bit.

That being said, one of the more immediate things I’ve been focusing on is helping out and mentoring with the CryptoPop Art Guild (CPAG): an art x Axie Infinity scholarship sponsoring underprivileged Filipino artists. I believe that this is the best way that I can give back a bit–in ways that I can– to a community that has made the dream of creative freedom come true for me.

I don’t really know where all this is going to go, or what life would be like a month/six months/six years from now, but I know that it’s going to be an adventure. In the meantime, I have a whole bunch of social media accounts and webpages I probably need to update.